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the Yronwode Institution for
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Books About Divining Rods,
Dowsing, Doodlebugging, Water Witching
and Pendulum Divination
Published Prior to 1980

compiled by catherine yronwode

copyright 2010
Yronwode Institution for the Preservation and Popularization of Indigenous Ethnomagicology
(Y.I.P.P.I.E.)
The Divining Rods, Dowsing, Doodlebugging, Water Witching, and Pendulum Divination Bibliography is copyright 2010 by the Yronwode Institution for the Preservation and Popularization of Indigenous Ethnomagicology (Y.I.P.P.I.E.), and all rights are reserved. In other words, you may download The Divining Rods, Dowsing, Doodlebugging, Water Witching, and Pendulum Divination Bibliography and print it out at home for your own use, but you may not further copy it, because the copyright holder controls the copying rights. Specifically, you may not mirror The Divining Rods, Dowsing, Doodlebugging, Water Witching, and Pendulum Divination Bibliography to other web sites, you may not distribute it or publish it in print form (either for money or for free), and you may not electronically distribute it in e-lists or usenet (either for money or for free) without the express written permission of the copyright holder.

Compiler's note on the contents of this bibliography: The books and periodicals included in this list cover a fairly large and overlapping -- but not always compatible -- array of foundational beliefs, objectives, methods, and tools.

FOUNDATIONAL BELIEFS: Dowsers base their work on a variety of beliefs and traditions, which may -- or may NOT -- include:
Active Dowsing: The belief that dowsing tools, like domestic animals, are allies that can and should be "trained" to work for the dowser, who is the active participant.
Passive Dowsing: The belief that higher forces, divine spirits, or astral energies guide the tools and that the dowser's main task is to be submissively receptive.
Psychological Dowsing: The belief that the act of dowsing consists of us asking our own brains for knowledge which we are not conscious we possess.
Electro-Magnetic Dowsing: The belief that the act of dowsing consists of using tools to magnify real but minute electro-magnetic anomolies and resonances to a perceptible threshold.
Natural Dowsing: The belief that children make excellent "natural" dowsers until and unless they absorb societal beliefs that cause them to consider dowsing unrealistic.

OBJECTIVES: The reasons one might wish to dowse or divine with a hand-tool include:
Hard Target Dowsing: This is the search for verifiable physical substances, such as water, oil, minerals, or lost possessions.
Soft Target Dowsing: This is the search for subtle energies, such as ley lines, and spiritual entities, such as ghosts.
Informational Dowsing: This is the search for answers to questions, including "Yes / No" questions and complex queries such as, "Which puppy in this litter will make the best herding dog?"

METHODS: The methods used in dowsing include:
Field Dowsing: Walking the field or physical location is a common method when one is engaged in hard-target dowsing.
Scanning: The dowser walks along one edge of the field, using L-Rods to triuangulate where to enter and then to locate a limited target area, saving much time that would otherwise be spent walking the field.
Map Dowsing: The dowser uses a map as a proxy for the field or location.
Remote Dowsing: The dowser simply visualizes the area to be dowsed.
Body Dowsing: This consists of dowsing over a living human, animal, or plant for the purposes of diagnosis and treatment.
Chart Dowsing: This consists of using a pre-determined layout, board, or chart for informational dowsing, usually performed on a table.
Free-Hand Informational Dowsing: This form of informational dowsing is usually conducted with a pendulum and does not involve a chart or layout.
Hand Dowsing: No tools are used; the dowser simply extends a hand and reads the energy directly.

TOOLS: The hand-tools used in dowsing include:
Y-Rod: This is a forked tree branch, often cut fresh for the occasion.
L-Rods: This is a pair of L-shaped metal rods.
Mosaic Rod, Rod of Aaron, Bobber: A single wand, stick, or branch; if it is weighted at the tip, it is called a bobber.
Cameron Aurameter: This is a single L-rod containing a coiled spring and a weighted bobber tip; it is highly sensitive to motions.
Plumb-Bob Pendulum: This is a metal, stone, or glass weight or bob on a string or chain.
Witness Sample Pendulum: This is a chambered or hollow pendulum into which can be inserted a small sample specimen of the item for which one is searching.
Impromptu Pendulum: This can be a ring, button, root, key, jack ball, holed stone, or any convenient object suspended on a string, thread, or chain.

PART ONE: TITLES IN ENGLISH

Archdale, F. A. Elementary Radiesthesia: and The Use of the Pendulum
1950.
Reprinted, Third Edition, 1956.
Reprinted, Mokelumme Hill, California, Health Research, 1961.

Baritel, M. Jacob's Rod: A Translation from The French of a Rare and Curious Work, A.D. 1693, on the Art of Finding Springs, Mines, and Minerals by Means of the Hazel Rod: To Which Is Appended Researches, With Proofs of the Existence of a More Certain and Far Higher Faculty, With Clear and Ample Instruction for Using It. Published By The Translator
Originally published in French at Lyon, 1693.
Translated into English, with additional text by the translator, Thos. Welton, and published in London by Thos. Welton, 1875.
Reprinted as Jacob's Rod: The Art of Finidng Springs, Mines, and Minerals by Means of the Hazel Rod by by Fredonia Books, 2002.

In this book, dowsing is called Bletonism. The first part, by M. Baritel, is about water dowsing and the like. there are bibliographical notes elsewhere that indicate that M. Baritel may have been a pseudonym for Jean Nicolas. The second part of the book, written by the translator Thomas Welton, deals with trance dowsing and also contains one of the earliest references to map dowsing.

Barrett, Sir WIlliam and Besterman, Theodore. The Divining Rod: An Experimental and Psychological Investigation.
London, Methuen & Co., Ltd. 1926
Reprinted, New Hyde Park, N.Y., University Books, 1968.

Baum, Joseph. The Beginner's Handbook of Dowsing: The Ancient Art of Divining Underground Water Sources.
Crown Publishers, 1974

Beasse, Pierre. New and Rational Treatise of Dowsing According to the Methods of Physical Radiesthesia Excluding Any Kind of Occultism, and Open to Everybody
1941.
Reprinted, Hastings, United Kingdom, Society of Metaphysicians Ltd, 1986.
214 pages; 91 illustrations.

Bell, H. Practical Dowsing: A Symposium.
London: G. Bell & Sons Ltd., 1965.
Hard Cover with Dust Jacket, viii + 197 pages.

Besterman, Theodore. The Divining Rod: An Experimental and Psychological Investigation.
1926

Theodore Deodatus Nathaniel Besterman (1904–1976) was a psychical researcher, bibliographer, biographer, and translator. Born in Lódź, Poland, he moved to England while still young. In 1924 he wrote his first book on psychical phenomena, "Crystal Gazing: A study in the History, Distribution and Practice of Scrying," which was followed by "The Divining Rod: An Experimental and Psychological Investigation" (1926). From 1927 to 1935 he was the investigating officer for the Society for Psychical Research. "Water Divining: New Facts & Theories" (1938) was his last book on psychism. He served in the British Royal Artillery during World War Two and subsequently worked for UNESCO. During the 1950s he lived in Switzerland and thenceforward devoted himself to translation, biography, and bibliographical writing about Voltaire. He returned to England in the late 1960s and died there in 1976.

Besterman, Theodore. Water Divining: New Facts & Theories.
London: Methuen, 1938. 207 pages

Theodore Deodatus Nathaniel Besterman (1904–1976) was a psychical researcher, bibliographer, biographer, and translator. Born in Lódź, Poland, he moved to England while still young. In 1924 he wrote his first book on psychical phenomena, "Crystal Gazing: A study in the History, Distribution and Practice of Scrying," which was followed by "The Divining Rod: An Experimental and Psychological Investigation" (1926). From 1927 to 1935 he was the investigating officer for the Society for Psychical Research. "Water Divining: New Facts & Theories" (1938) was his last book on psychism. He served in the British Royal Artillery during World War Two and subsequently worked for UNESCO. During the 1950s he lived in Switzerland and thenceforward devoted himself to translation, biography, and bibliographical writing about Voltaire. He returned to England in the late 1960s and died there in 1976.

Bird, Christopher. The Divining Hand.
New York, E. P. Dutton, 1979.

This is a very large and thorough book, containing a definitive history of dowsing from the 15th century to the 20th century, along with practical advice on how to become an effective dowser.

Cameron, Verne L. Aquavideo; Locating Underground Water.
Santa Barbara, California, El Cariso, 1970.

Verne L. Cameron (August 14, 1896 - November 11, 1970) was an American dowser, best known for his development of the Cameron Aurameter, a variation on the L-rod doodlebug device.

Cameron, Verne L. Map Dowsing.
Santa Barbara, California, El Cariso, 1971.

Verne L. Cameron (August 14, 1896 - November 11, 1970) was an American dowser, best known for his development of the Cameron Aurameter, a variation on the L-rod doodlebug device.

Cameron, Verne L. Oil Locating.
Santa Barbara, California, El Cariso, 1971.
paperback, 35 p.
reprinted in hardcover by Life Understanding Foundation, 1997.

Verne L. Cameron (August 14, 1896 - November 11, 1970) was an American dowser, best known for his development of the Cameron Aurameter, a variation on the L-rod doodlebug device.

Chambers, Howard V. Dowsing, Water Witches and Divining Rods for the Millions.
Los Angeles, Sherbourne Press, 1969.

Cooper-Hunt, C. L. Radiesthetic Analysis
1955.
Reprinted, Mokelumme Hill, California, Health Research, 1996.
40 pages.

De France, Henry. The Elements of Dowsing.
London, 1948.

Ellis, Arthur J. The Divining Rod: A History of Water Witching. (United States Geological Survey, Water Supply Paper 416)
Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, Department of the Interior, 1917.
59 pages. Softcover pamphlet, 6" x 9 ", in stiff stapled wraps, Illustrated; includes a 25 p. bibliography, index,
Reprinted 1938.
Reprinted 1957.

The U. S. Geological Survey printed this monograph to discourage the widespread belief in water witching. A summary of divining rods and the people who have made claims for them. The bibliography covers 500 years of references from 1532 ("A True Yet Brief Description of The Wand of Mercury") to 1949 ("Psychical Physics").

Finch, W.J. The Pendulum and Possession
Cottonwood, Arizona, Esoteric Publications, 1975.

Excellent instructions on how to use a pendulum.

George, Karl. Dowsing: The Science of Water-Witching.
Laurel, Montana, Karl George, 1974. Illustrated. 140 p. plus two laid-in sheets (4 p.) of illustrations.

A detailed series of case histories of experiments conducted by the author.

Graves, Tom. Dowsing: Techniques and Applications.
London, Turnstone Books, 1976.

Graves, T. Dowsing and Archaeology.
London, Turnstone Books, 1980.

Graves, T. The Diviner's Handbook.
Wellingborough, The Aquarian Press, 1986.

(This was published past the stated cut-off date of 1980, but is included because the author had written two previous titles on the same subject.)

Hitching, Francis. Pendulum: The Psi Connection.
UK, Fontana, 1977

Hitching, Francis. Dowsing: The Psi Connection.
Garden City, N.Y., Anchor Press, 1978

Layne, Meade, and Riley H Crabb. The Cameron Aurameter.
Garberville, California, Borderland Sciences, 1970

Leftwich, Robert H. Dowsing: The Ancient Art of Rhamdomancy.
Aquarian, 1977. Paperback. 64 pages.

Lethbridge, Tom C.. Ghost and Divining Rod.
UK, Routledge & Kengan Paul, 1963

This book is about ghost-hunting with the tools of dowsing.

Lethbridge, Tom C.. The Power of the Pendulum.
New York, Routledge & Kengan Paul, 1976

[Life Savers], Life Savers Book-O-Secrets for 'Holesome Entertainmint.
Life Savers, Incorporated, Port Chester, N.Y., 1931
32 pages plus colour wraps; only one chapter on Divining Rods, but what a cool booklet; published by a candy manufacturer.

Maby, J. Cecil, and Franklin, T. B. The Physics of the Divining Rod, Being an Account of an Experimental Investigation of Water and Mineral Divining.
London, George Bell, 1939.

MacLean, Gordon. A Field Guide To Dowsing.
Danville, Vermont, American Society of Dowsers. 1971.
Illustrated.
1971: Dowsing. An Introduction to an Ancient Practice. A Book of Instruction. South Portland, Maine. 46 mimeographed pages with 6 illustrations within the text, bound in illustrated card covers.
Reprinted in 1976 as A Field Guide To Dowsing: How to Practice the Ancient Art Today, 44 pages typeset and printed.

Brief as it is, this is one of the most important books on all forms of dowsing ever published and it has been the most valuable and instructive text used by the present bibliographer. It is currently being kept in print by the ASD in the form of a 32 page photocopied saddle-stitched pamphlet missing some illustrations and some outdated information about the ASD. Highly recommended. If you only buy one text on dowsing, this should be it. If ever a book deserved a really clean restoration and reprinting and wider distribution, this would be it.

Mager, Henri. Water Diviners and Their Methods.
London, George Bell, 1931.

Maury, Marguerite. How to Dowse: Experimental and Practical Radiasthesia.
London, G. Bell and Sons, 1953.

Mermet, Abbe. Principles & Practice of Radiesthesia.
London, 1967.

Mullins, J. and Sons. The Divining Rod: Its History, Truthfulness and Practicability.
Box, Wiltshire, Colerne, 1894.

Naylor, P. Discovering Dowsing and Divining.
Princes Risborough, Shire Publications Ltd., 1980.

Nicolas, Jean. Jacob's Rod.
English translation of La Verge de Jacob (1693).
London: Thomas Welton, 1875.

Nielsen, Greg, and J. Polansky. Pendulum Power.
New York: Warner, 1977.

Roberts, Kenneth. Henry Gross and His Dowsing Rod.
Garden City, N.Y., Doubleday, 1951.
Hardcover in Dust Jacket. (tan cloth w/ black and gilt titles)
reprinted several times.

The story of Henry Gross as told by Kenneth Roberts, who first encountered him in 1947 in Kennebunkport, Maine, where Roberts lived an his farm which was being threatened by a huge forest fire. Later Roberts was instrumental in helping Gross develop his skill and to bring it to the attention of scientists. In 1949 the island of Bermuda, which traditionally relied upon roof top rainwater catch-basins, was hit by the worst drought in four decades. Even though hydrologists declared that there was little underground fresh water available, dowser Henry Gross map-dowsed from his home in Maine the general locations of four good freshwater sources in Bermuda. Already existent wells had provided little palatable water, being mostly salty or brackish in content. When Gross was summoned to Bermuda, he accurately pinpointed his four locations which in turn were drilled for water. They were completed in 1950, wherein the four wells were able to produce two million gallons of fresh water per day for public consumption.

Roberts, Kenneth. The Seventh Sense.
Garden City, N.Y.:, Doubleday, 1953

Roberts, Kenneth. Water Unlimited.
Garden City, N.Y., Doubleday., 1957

Scott-Elliot, Major General James. Dowsing -- One Man's Way.
UK, Neville Spearman, 1977.

Stark, Erwin E. A History of Dowsing and Energy Relationships.
North Hollywood, California, BAC, 1978.

Tompkins, B. Springs of Water and How to Discover Them By the Divining-Rod.
London, Hurst & Blackett Ltd., n.d. (circa 1920).

Tromp, S. W. Psychical Physics: A Scientific Analysis of Dowsing, Radiesthesia and Kindred Divining Phenomena.
New York, Elsevier Publishing Company, 1949.

Underwood, Peter. The Complete Book of Dowsing and Divining.
London, Rider & Company, 1980. Hardcover with Dust jacket, 229 pages.
includes index, bibliography, and b&w illustrations.

Vogt, Evon Z., and Hyman, Ray. Water Witching, U.S.A.
Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1959.
Hardcover in Dust jJacket.
2nd ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1979.

Wayland, Bruce and Shirley Wayland. Steps to Dowsing Power.
Life Force Press, 1976.

Weaver, Herbert. Divining, the Primary Sense: Unfamiliar Radiation in Nature, Art and Science.
London, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1978.

Wethered, Vernon D. The Practice of Medical Radiesthesia.
Beekman Books, 1977.

Willey, Raymond C. Modern Dowsing: The Dowser's Handbook.
Cottonwood, AZ, Esoteric Publications, 1976.

Williams, Anne. The Pendulum Book of Charts.
New York City, New York, Tower Press, 1979.
Reprinted many times.

This is a slim pamphlet, but valuable enough to learners that it went through nine printings from 1979 to 2009, and is still in print. The author presents a series of arc-shaped charts for pendulum readings on a table (as opposed to field readings or land readings), and the topics covered are more personal than socially engaged. In other words, rather than the search for potable water, Williams encourages the pendulum dowser to ask questions relating to personal moods, nutrients, colour rays for healing, career choices, and the like. The rise of this introspective approach to pendulum consultation marked the beginning of a split between active pendulum dowsing and passive pendulum divination -- a split that widened through the course of the later 20th and early 21st centuries.

Wyman, Walker D. Witching for Water, Oil, Pipes, and Precious Minerals.
River Falls, Wisconsin, University of Wisconsin-River Falls Press, 1977.

PART TWO: TITLES NOT IN ENGLISH

Benedikt, M. Ruten-und Pendel-lehre.
Vienna, Leipzig, 1917.

Carrie, Abbe. L'hydroscopographie et Metalloscopographie, ou l'art de Decouvrir les Sources et les Gisement Metallifers au Moyen de l'Electro-Magnetisme.
Saintes, France, 1863.

Chevreul, M. E. De la Baguette Divinatoire, du Pendule dit Explorateur, et des Tables Tournantes.
Paris, 1854.

De Morogues, Baron. Observations sur le fFluide Organoelectrique.
Paris, 1854.

De Vallemont, Abbe. La Physique Occulte, ou Traite de la Baguette Divinatoire.
Paris, 1693.

Holly, Dr Theodose A. Notions Methaphysiques et Autres, Revelees ou Confirmees par la Radiesthesie: Dieu et L'Univers (Mecanisme Du Monde) - Tome I
Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Imp. V. Valcin, ND [circa 1940],
6 1/8" x 9" tall, paperbound wraps, 144p. plus table of contents.

Klinckowstroem, Graf von. Virgula divina. Ein Beitrag zur Geschichte der Wuenschelrute.
Berlin, 1910.

Mullins, J. and Sons. The Divining Rod; Its History, Truthfulness and Practicability. Colerne, Box, Wiltshire. 1894

Nicolas, Jean. La Verge de Jacob, ou l'Art de Trouver les Tresors les Sources, les Limites, les Metaux, les Mines, les Mineraux et Outres Cachees, par l'Usage du Baton Fourche.
Lyons, France, 1693. Translated as Jacob's Rod.

Rocard, Y. Le Signal du Sourcier.
Paris, Dunod, 1964.

PART THREE: ARTICLES IN PERIODICAL MAGAZINES

The present bibliography only covers books on dowsing, water-witching, and doodlebugging published prior to 1980.

For a similar bibliography covering articles on dowsing, water-witching, and doodlebugging published in periodical magazines prior to 1980, see:

Hansen, George P. Dowsing: A Review of Experimental Research.
Journal of the Society for Psychical Research. Vol. 51, No. 792, pp. 343-367, October, 1982.

A digital electronic version of Hansen's bibliography is also available at the Hansen's own web site, Trickster Book:

http://www.tricksterbook.com/ArticlesOnline/Dowsing.htm (accessed 08/09/2010)